Cruise Tips / Cruise Terms Worth Knowing Before You Board: Part 2

The D to Ts Cruise Terms Worth Knowing

By: Ilona Kauremszky

In our series Cruise Terms Worth Knowing we have come across a variety of other terms that might stump the newbie cruiser. For the cruise veteran, it’s industry lingo that’s worth repeating.

Here’s a cool tearsheet good to use the next time you board a ship.

The D to Ts Cruise Terms Worth Knowing:

Disembark

Everybody’s got to get off a cruise ship sometime. It means to leave a ship because you are going ashore. Now, you might hear “debark” – this term is perfectly acceptable too.

Embark

Yes, everybody’s gotta return to the cruise ship so you are now boarding the ship. “Ahoy”

FIT

Your travel agent might blurt this as you are making an individual booking for either yourself or a small group who are not interested in any frilly packages. Basically, it’s just the straight goods and stands for “Fully or freely independent travel.”

French balcony

No you’re not in France but you are in a suite that has a wall-to-wall glass door that opens to fresh breezes minus the actual balcony. A French balcony is popular on river ships.

Gangway

Now it’s time to leave the ship so get ready to exit on a ramp walkway suspended between the ship and dock. That sliver-wide portable bridge is called the Gangway.

Inside stateroom

So you want to save money and don’t care about the fancy porthole or the French balcony, in fact, you don’t even want a view. Welcome to the inside stateroom. These cruise cabins are typically cheaper.

Knot

How fast are we going anyway? The ship crew will announce the speed in knots.

Lido Deck

This is the open pool deck.

Also to be read:Cruise Terms Worth Knowing Before You Board: Part 1

Loyalty Program

For repeat cruise guests major cruise companies typically offer perks and rewards to encourage future bookings. The more frequently you cruise the more benefits you will receive.

Muster

Every passenger must fulfill this task. It’s the safety drill which occurs at the beginning of a cruise and indicates the location where you and a group of passengers must gather.

Oceanview Cabin

It’s the cabin/stateroom with a porthole or window.

Onboard credit

“Free” spending money onboard the ship.

Open seating

Nothing fancy, it’s open table seating so no dining reservations are required.

Passenger-crew ratio

Luxury cruise lines like to tell you how many crew serve a single passenger. The larger crew number suggests better service.

Port

When you’re facing forward on a ship, it’s the ship’s left side.

Ports of Call

The number of stops on a cruise where guests leave the ship for sightseeing excursions.

Pre or Post

Extra days that can be tacked onto your cruise giving you additional stay days at the start or end of the cruise. A cruise company often offers packages for this experience.

Repositioning Cruise

A seasonal activity that occurs when an ocean cruise has completed sails in one water and heads to another. Let’s say the cruise ship finishes its season in the Mediterranean Sea then sails to the Caribbean to start the next season.

Single Supplement

Solo travellers often pay this extra charge to stay alone in a stateroom/cabin.

Starboard

When you’re facing forward on the ship it’s the ship’s ride side.

Tender

Small boats – like a taxi ferry service used to transport passengers to the mainland used usually for shallow harbours.